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Document ‘Habit’

Yesterday I was feeling pretty tired at work so I went for a walk around the block. A walk was all it was supposed to be, but somehow I returned with a shiny new pair of boots clasped in my hand. I’m not exactly sure how it happened; one minute I was strolling along the street minding my own business, the next I was handing over my debit card to a slightly bored looking cashier. It’s all a bit of a blur to be honest. I had actually originally gone into H&M looking for one of those baker boy hats I’ve seen fashionable young things wearing everywhere (alas, any hat makes my small round head look like a peanut), when I clapped my eyes on the most perfect boots I’ve ever seen. Black, laced with silver eyelets, with a sturdy heel, these were the ball crushing boots of my dreams. I immediately thought of all the cool women through history who had donned a pair of boots like these; Debbie Harry, to Courtney Love, to Leela from Futurama, and knew that I had to have them. I’ve often said that I have an addiction to buying clothes and accessories – the adrenaline rush is like nothing else, all my brain’s pleasure centres lighting up as I hand over cold hard cash in exchange for goods and services. I’m a capitalist pig, and part of me hates it. It’s a very good thing that I don’t take drugs because of my addictive tendencies – and I’m sure if I were wealthy I would spend in excess. These days I’m limited to the odd tenner here and there, but just imagine the possibilities. Just imagine the clothes. Anyway, as I’m feeling kind of punky in my new boots, today’s Track Of The day is a little taste of punk/hardcore all the way from Tel-Aviv. Formed by a group of musicians who share a love of all things 80’s art-punk, Document’s latest single ‘Habit‘ is a mile a minute punk romp, taken from their new album ‘The Void Repeats‘. Raucous drums and haphazard guitar riffs compliment lead singer Nir Ben Jacob’s intriguing vocal melodies as he explores the feeling of not belonging anywhere in the modern age of digital addiction and heavy handed bureaucracy. Enjoy.


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