emay

Emay
“Bakkah: The History Of Humankind”

emay

Over 15 years ago we learned one of our most important life lessons (there are fucking loads of them by the way – compliment your barber. Sure, there are a lot of stoic types, particularly in London, who have been brought up to fear and avoid the rest of the general public that we live, eat and shit with, who would prefer to sit there in lingering silence whilst someone else slices of parts of them (albeit bits that don’t have any nerve endings, so obviously this is fine). For us, we find that it is often advantageous to develop a slight rapport with someone that you are legally empowering to hold a literally razor-sharp object that close to your head; not least of all due to the obvious and often-incurred physical injuries one might encounter along the course of the experience (the top of our earlobe got munted by some guy when we were a kid), but of course you mitigate the risk of ending up with a shit haircut if you actually communicate with the person purporting to sort you out. We could veer off even further from the point of this prose by saying that we’re now bezzie mates with our new guy Billy at Toni & Guy at Brent Cross shopping centre, and how he knows his shit when it comes to hip-hop, but instead we’ll just concentrate on the centralised theme on the importance of communication, and indeed different forms of it. Music is one, for example, and often subtle messages can be conveyed in the visualisation of that music to reinforce the underlying sentiment it is trying to project as a whole, which is very much the case with current Track Of The Day person Emay. Our guy Emay – from Ontario in Canada, a country which we find ourselves particularly fond of especially these days, and currently being repped by the far-more-reputable Fader – got in touch just before the weekend with the video for his new one Bakkah: The History Of Humankind. Because we’re not very good at the whole music thing generally-speaking, it took us a few attempts to grasp the rhythm of the track, but to be honest we found ourselves far more led by the spoken-word nature of Emay‘s thinking-man’s hip-hop, and the undoubted social commentary being projected therein as well as with this stunning video he’s also sent over, that really our pre-conceptions of the pop agenda and indeed structure basically did one. It’s just something you’ll gladly enjoy getting entirely lost in much like the same way we have in Mos Def‘s Black On Both Sides, which we suppose one should do every so often before things become too routine. Like a haircut, or something like that.

 


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